Displaying items by tag: christianity

One of the major differences between conservatives and progressives is that we demand protections for all citizens, whereas in general, progressives demand rights for their adherents exclusively. This difference has been particularly noticeable during the campaign for marriage equality, although it shows up across the board. Progressives have taken to openly criticising us for our desire to preserve our freedoms. Gay rights activist, Rodney Croome, goes so far as to say that for conservatives - whom Croome refers to as the radical right -  the fear of losing freedoms is actually an attempt to gain power:

For many, the link between contraception and abortion is clear: when the potential for babies is taken out of sexual activity, then pregnancy becomes an intrusion, an unintended consequence. It becomes something to be avoided at all costs – even if that cost includes taking a life. But sadly, that connection isn’t clear to every pro-life person – even to many Christians. This is the first in a series of testimonies by Christians who rejected artificial contraception because they were convicted by God to grow in faith and leave their fertility in His hands.

Published in Contraception
Saturday, 23 September 2017 17:50

55 Consequences of Redefining Marriage

In his essay in the Public Discourse, law professor Bradley Miller suggests studying the effects of redefining marriage using three criteria:

Anyone interested in assessing the impact of same-sex marriage on public life should investigate the outcomes in three spheres: first, human rights (including impacts on freedom of speech, parental rights in public education, and the autonomy of religious institutions); second, further developments in what sorts of relationships political society will be willing to recognize as a marriage (e.g., polygamy); and third, the social practice of marriage.

We're going to take a trip around the world to look at the consequences for Christians where same-sex marriage has been legalised. And it's not only Christians who have suffered after this legislation was passed, but also atheists, agnostics, Jews and even gays themselves. The following list is only 55 of those consequences from 13 of the countries that have redefined marriage. [Note regarding citations: Several consecutive examples have a common source; the link for this is given after the last example.]  

Canada

Canada legalised same-sex marriage in 2002. Now:

  • civil celebrants sacked for refusing to perform same-sex weddings
  • writing a letter to the editor supporting traditional marriage is now considered hate speech
  • professional governing bodies can be sued for discrimination
  • for promoting traditional marriage over same sex marriage
  • parents have lost authority over their children's education
  • religious schools must tolerate groups who promote homosexuality. [Source]
  • legal action is underway to secure marriage for polygamists.[Source]
  • most cases of bestiality now legal [Source]
  • Definitely no evidence of an increase in stability. [Source]
  • Children can be removed from heterosexual parents who don't support same-sex marriage [Source]
  • pop music, (eg a Dire Straits classic) can be banned for containing words the offend homosexuals [Source]

 

Britain:

Britain legalised same sex marriage in 2013 via parliamentary vote. Now:

  • 'heteronormative' pronouns and words are prohibited in many places,
  • churches are under pressure to no longer refuse to perform same-sex marriages (protections were given at the time legislation went through),
  • Christians and other parents who oppose same-sex marriage may no longer adopt children,
  • seven faith schools are close to being shut down for failing to teach that same-sex marriage is equivalent to traditional marriage
  • no opt-out for students in sexualised school lessons, which begin at age 3. (Source)
  • Christian relationship counsellors must counsel same-sex couples [Source]
  • magistrates unable to opt-out of same-sex adoption cases [Source]
  • social media criticism of same-sex marriage can lead to demotion/pay cut [Source]
  • criticism of 'Pride' marches potentially constitutes a hate-crime [Source]
  • Promoting Easter church services warrants enquiry into homosexual 'offence' [Source]
  • Suggesting that homosexuals can change orientation warrants police enquiry [Source]
  • Employees can be dismissed for supporting traditional view of marriage [Source]
  • Clergy can be fined and sent to re-education for exercising employment rights [Source]
  • polygamy is becoming more popular in the UK [Source]

Ireland

Ireland legalised same-sex marriage in 2015 by referendum. Now:

  • small businesses can't refuse to service same-sex weddings [Source]
  • The door has been opened for recognising polygamous marriages [Source]

Scotland

Scotland legalised same-sex marriage in 2014. Now:

  • Christians are persecuted for preaching against homosexuality [Source]
  • Clergy who oppose homosexuality committing an unofficial hate-crime [Source]

 

USA

The Supreme Court of the United States legalised same-sex marriage in 2015. Now:

  • florists can't refuse to supply same-sex weddings [Source] 
  • Bakers can't refuse their services. [Source]
  • employees can be fired for expressing their opposition to same-sex marriage
  • lawyers can fail their bar test for not supporting same-sex marriage
  • Catholic adoption agencies have closed rather than serve same-sex couples
  • parents unable to opt children out of sexualised school classes [Source]
  • Calls for polygamy to be made legal [Source]
  • Calls for 'machinism' (a relationship between a human and a computer) to be made legal [Source]
  • Gay 'pride' events have become more numerous and obscene
  • gay domestic violence has increased greatly [Source]

 

Denmark

Denmark legalised same-sex marriage in 2012. Now:

  • Churches are being forced to perform same-sex weddings (protections were initially offered.) [Source]

Belgium

Belgium legalised same sex marriage in 2003. Now:

  • Clergy are persecuted for criticising homosexuality [Source]

 

Sweden

Sweden legalised same-sex marriage in 2009. Now:

  • no priest in the Swedish Church can refuse to perform a sane-sex wedding [Source]
  • preaching against homosexuality is a hate-crime [Source]
  • It is a crime to question the homosexual agenda within the school system [Source]
  • Christian groups who investigate the harms of homosexuality are persecuted [Source]

 

Spain 

Spain legalised same-sex marriage in 2005. Now:

  • On birth certificates, 'mother' and 'father' have been replaced by 'progenitor A' or 'B' [Source]
  • Clergy are persecuted for criticising homosexuality, IVF for gay couples etc [Source]

Germany

Germany legalised same-sex marriage in 2017. Now:

  • the media now links terrorism with 'homophobia' [Source]

 

Columbia 

Columbia legalised same-sex marriage in 2016. Now:
  • There is a push for legal recognition of polygamy [Source]

France

Legalised same sex marriage in 2013. Now:

  • criticising same-sex relationships is a hate-crime [Source]

 

Netherlands

The Netherlands legalised same-sex marriage in 2000. Now:

  • Celebrants are forced to perform ceremonies in some areas [Source]
  • Same-sex couples have equal rights to adopt [Source]
  • Businesses can be forced to provide services that promote homosexuality [Source]
  • Persecution of clergy who fail to support homosexuality [Source]
  • heterosexual marriage rates fell after same-sex marriage was legalised [Source]

 

13 Countries, 55 Consequences of Redefining Marriage

The examples above represent only some of the cases of persecution and discrimination that have occurred and are occurring where marriage has been redefined. In addition to these examples, there are reports to suggest that the legalisation of same-sex marriage will have an enormous impact on heterosexuals in other ways, and particularly on men. [Read more here] As Christians, we  know that the push to redefine marriage is part of a broader attack on the family, one with its roots in Marxism. In fact, Marx himself declared war on the family and Christianity, when he said:

Thus, for instance, after the earthly family is discovered to be the secret of the holy family, the former must then itself be destroyed in theory and in practice.

We simply cannot trust Yes campaigners and politicians who tell us that same-sex marriage is 'all about love'. We know full well that redefining marriage is only the tip of the iceberg and that discrimination against marriage traditionalists is certain to ensue. It's not about love, it's all about the consequences. Please vote no.  

 

In accordance with s 6(5) of the Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Act 2017, this communication was authorised by Kathy Clubb of Melbourne, Vic.  

Published in Marriage
Sunday, 03 September 2017 14:00

A Catholic Response to the Marriage Debate

While Dave Pellowe has written a very useful article intended to equip Protestant pastors, I thought I'd put together some resources specifically for Catholics or for those who want to understand the Church's stance on marriage. There has been a great deal of misinformation in Catholic circles regarding the marriage debate: while the Church's teaching is very clear, there are those who are content to deviate from this teaching and promote their own views - views which may in some circumstances be classified as formal heresy. [See Edward Peter's article linked below.] One example of this is a statement from Jesuit lecturer Fr. Frank Brennan, which suggests that it is appropriate for Catholics to support the  redefinition of marriage and that it may even be 'good for society.' [Click here to read his views.]

Published in Gender Mainstreaming

Brian Houston set an example to follow for many church leaders recently when he issued a media release outlining his teaching on Biblical marriage and encouragement for Christians to vote against its redefinition. He reiterated the literal interpretation of the Apostle Paul’s position on homosexuality, and called for respect from both sides for the other, clarifying that disagreement based in faith convictions is not bigotry. He encouraged Christians to participate in the voluntary vote, and to refuse to be the silent majority, in effect surrendering to aggressive voices seeking to dominate the future of our society. Christians are already being discomforted by cultural Marxism‘s advance in Australia. Just ask Tasmanian Archbishop Julian Porteous how free he feels to teach on marriage after being punished by the process of an anti-discrimination complaint against him for doing so. Ask Bernard Gaynor how free he feels to privately blog about the injustice and offense of Christian vilification and public indecency at the Homosexual Mardis Gras after the court ruled his employer could unjustly fire him for disagreeing with their workplace anti discrimination policies.

Published in Gender Mainstreaming

Australia is a multi-faith society. The 2016 Census shows that, while the mix of beliefs has changed over the years, Australia remains a pretty religious place. In the last census, nearly 70% of Australians self-identified as religious. The number of Australians who have self-identified as Christian in the census has fallen from 88.2% in 1966 to 52.1% in 2016. The number of Australians identifying as being of another religion has grown from 0.8% to 8.2%, with Islam (2.6%), Buddhism (2.4%) and Hinduism (1.9%) being the largest non-Christian faiths. The number who self-identified in the category of “no religion” has grown from 0.8% to 30.1%. This category includes having secular beliefs, other spiritual beliefs or having no religion. This makes it hard to be sure what these Australians believe.

Published in Religious Freedom

Let me open with a few home truths: -Those demanding the complete redefinition – and thus destruction – of marriage do NOT want a debate on the matter. -They want it rammed through without the agreement of the public. -They do not have facts and evidence on their side, which is why they despise debate. -They therefore do not seek to win the debate – they seek to shut down the debate. -If they must engage in debate, the best they can come up with is ad hominem attacks, mud-slinging, name-calling, hate and hysteria. All this is easily enough documented. As to the other side preventing genuine debate from taking place, and shutting down the ‘No’ voice on homosexual marriage, consider a few recent articles.

Published in Religious Freedom
Monday, 03 April 2017 08:32

Cardinal George Pell on Islam

This talk was given by Cardinal George Pell at the Legatus Summit in Florida, in 2006. It appears on the Endeavour Forum website and is used here by permission. The Endeavour Forum is an Australian organisation, who describes itself thus: 

Endeavour Forum started out as Women Who Want to be Women. That explains the four Ws on the ship Endeavour above. [ - on their emblem.] It was set up in response the militant feminism which first came around in the early 1970s and which became increasingly influential in the Whitlam and even Fraser Governments. While militant feminism did address some legitimate grievances it went too far getting into issues like abortion, equal opportunity and affirmative action. There was a need for women to defend the legitimate rights of traditional women in families and the rights of male breadwinners to get jobs. We believe that men and women are equal but different not equal and the same.

There's really no such thing as friends and family when it comes to freedom of speech... at least not when you are a conservative Christian. (Dedicated to Pops) It's almost the three year anniversary, to the month, since I met my good friend, and now mentor Bill Muehlenberg via Facebook and found the mass of resources contained on his website Culture Watch .It was through these channels, and many others, that I was exposed to the Christian conservative, political and public discourse on the issues of the day, in what I now know to be 'the culture wars'. This was to be the beginning of a new path for me, as a spark was lit in my soul, and I have been on a steep learning curve ever since.

Published in Christianity

We should relish the freedom of expression that a Christian culture established and particularly that it was not founded on the moral vacuum of atheism, given the tragic outcomes of secular humanistic governments of the past (such as Communist Russia, Romania, Cambodia, China, Nazi Germany, etc.). But ancient history fares no better, it is replete with the continual narrative of ‘blood feuds’, that is, the perpetual generational ‘right’ to avenge the spilling of blood or the threat of imperialist expansionism from Greek, Ming, Khan, Persian or Roman Empires. Here the ‘peace’ of millions was dependent on the submission of subjugated nations, such as the Roman Empire’s “Pax Romana”, or the Islamic Empire’s dhimmi status for conquered people. Against this brutal backdrop comes what some historians have called the “softening effect” of Christianity.

Published in Christianity
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