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I remember being a happy child. I had simple joys then. Some toys, some sweets, my playmates, a VHS tape of The Sound of Music, my beloved dog and my doting parents made me feel the luckiest kid on earth. But an experience suddenly burst my happy bubble when I was about nine years old. It was the 16th of January, a big feast in our small town is being celebrated. It was Sto. Nino’s fiesta (Feast of the Child Jesus). I remember being glad because there were no classes that day. Therefore I was allowed to watch The Sound of Music even if it wasn’t Friday.  

Abortion activists are at it again, attempting to introduce bubble-zones around New South Wales abortion facilities. As stated many times on this website, these so-called 'safe-access zones', also known as exclusion zones, are designed to stop advocates for life from offering assistance to desperate women who feel pressured to abort their children. They also hamper the freedom of political communication which should exist in a free society like Australia. Exclusion-zone law, very similar to that being proposed in New South Wales will be under the scrutiny of the High Court of Australia this year due to our legal challenge. Any politician who is realistic about the fiscal and time constraints that apply to our parliamentary system wouldn't dream of introducing legislation that has a constitutional cloud hanging over it.

World-renowned speaker, Jason Evert, was in Melbourne this week for a series of talks on the true nature of love. Jason has spoken to more than one million people about the virtue of chastity and has been a keynote speaker at five World Youth Days. He has written several books, including “Theology of the Body for Teens” and “How to Find Your Soulmate Without Losing Your Soul,” and has studied counselling and theology at the Franciscan University of Steubenville. It was my great pleasure to meet him and ask him a few questions about how a return to chastity can put the brakes on the abortion culture.

Monday, 14 May 2018 21:26

Preaching to an Intolerant Choir

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Israel Folau is known for being one of the best rugby players in Australia. Folau is also a practising Christian who isn't afraid to give his opinion and express his religious views. He has been under fire recently - to the point of being accused of hate crimes - for publicly stating that homosexuality is a sin. Wayne Smith, of the Australian, complained that Israel Folau should stop 'preaching' if he wants to keep playing football. Former rugby player, George Gregan, agreed and suggested that it is inappropriate for Folau to put his beliefs on a huge platform - despite those beliefs being shared by millions of people, of many diverse religious persuasions.

This is a paper I presented recently at an evening considering issues around euthanasia and assisted dying: Euthanasia Paper May 2018. It presents reasons why changing the law in these areas is not a good idea in the interests of society at large and the vulnerable sick and elderly in particular.

Monday, 07 May 2018 06:26

Save the 8th! Interview with Richard Casey

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By now, many of you will be familiar with the massive Save the 8th! campaign, mounted by Ireland's pro-life community. Abortion is currently illegal in Ireland, except under very few circumstances. On May 25th, a referendum will be held in Ireland to determine whether or not to repeal the constitution's 8th Amendment, adopted in 1983: protection of the unborn child. The mainstream media has, on the whole, supported the pro-abortion side, concentrating on the fact that many Irish women travel to England in order to procure abortions. However, this 'need' to travel simply shows that Irish women have been sold the same lie that is being spread around the world: a mistimed pregnancy will ruin women's lives.

Some commentators - even Christian ones - place children such as Alfie Evans firmly in the category of 'hopeless cases with unrealistic parents.' Bu as stated in my own article on the subject, Medical Tyranny and Parental Authority, this case is more about undermining parental authority than about whether or not Alfie's life could have been saved, or even extended had it been managed differently. For every high-profile case like Alfie's there are many unknown ones in existence around us, with parents left to wonder exactly where, along the way, they lost control over their children's medical care. - Ed.