Welcome
Kathy Clubb

Kathy Clubb

Founder and Editor of The Freedoms Project

Kathy has been active in pro-life work for 6 years and is involved in a constitutional challenge to Victoria’s exclusion-zone laws. She is the Melbourne co-ordinator for Family Life International and is a member of the Helpers of God’s Precious Infants. Kathy began writing about pro-life and Catholic issues at Light up the Darkness.net but broadened her range of topics as she came to learn more about the many threats to freedom which are common to all Christians. She is working on a Sociology degree. Very slowly. Kathy home-educates her youngest 7 children and considers her family to be her most important work.

From time to time, I think about a strange comment made by a doctor on the ABC documentary ” Inside the Clinic“. [Unfortunately, only the trailer is available now; I had made a transcript when it was first released.] The program followed the day-to-day workings inside the abortion facility where I once witnessed in suburban Melbourne. Some of my friends were interviewed for the program. This is the same doco that I wrote about in the article: “The Australian Abortionist Who Wants America’s Dead Babies” . In that post, I talked about a doctor from this same abortion facility who said she enjoyed her work and ‘was inspired’ by it. So …. she enjoys killing babies for a living. A male doctor is also featured, and was shown assessing an ultrasound image of a 7 week foetus. He said that the ultrasound showed a ‘dark little hole’ consistent with this gestation.  

Monday, 16 October 2017 21:30

The Pregnant Woman and Abortion

How Abortion Has Changed Women's Experience of Pregnancy

As wonderful and awesome as it is to be with child, we know it's also possible for mothers to face pregnancy with mixed feelings. This is only natural. Fear of childbirth was especially understandable in the past, when medical knowledge was more limited than it is today. Mothers frequently died due to complications that are easily treatable now. And there have always financial and other pressures that have meant the idea of a new pregnancy can take a little getting used to. But generally, mothers and fathers have learned to accept new life and gone on to successfully parent. Today, however, women face an added burden which simply didn't exist in times gone by. It is the pressure to abort. In the Western world and in any place where legal abortion has gained a foothold, abortion has become the default position for pregnancy - and not only for unplanned pregnancies. It's quite common in Australian hospitals and clinics for mothers to be asked, as their pregnancy is confirmed, whether they 'want to keep it'. "It's your choice," medical staff will say. And thus the pressure begins.

I'll be spending this day in court, answering my charge of violating an abortion facility exclusion zone in 2016. The "Safe-Access Zone" law is an amendment to the Public Health and Wellbeing Act, and takes this heinous abortion law to another level. Click here to read more about Safe Access zones.   On October 10th 2008, Victoria enacted some of the worst abortion laws in the world. That year there were 16,084 abortions performed in the state. That equates to 44 babies killed every day. If there has been no increase in the abortion rate - which is pretty unlikely -  then there are now 144, 756 little children missing from the Victorian landscape. I'm not in a position to evaluate the difference this law reform has made to the state. But, I'd like to offer a few observations on this sad anniversary.

Wednesday, 04 October 2017 09:26

Equality: You Keep Using That Word

 It's possibly the most fashionable word around these days, especially in Australia. Everyone wants it and no-one seems to have it. Every media outlet, organisation and business that wants to look hip is grooming its collective beard and committing to ensuring 'equality'. Even city councils are in on the act - and who'd ever thought for a moment that councils were not supposed to treat everyone equally? Surely councils are meant to collect the garbage of bigots and libertarians alike? The Greek philosopher Aristotle had something very interesting to say about all this. He said:

The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal.

This week, a young homosexual man was abused for opposing the redefinition of marriage in Australia. Angry Yes campaigners yelled insults and tried to drown out his speech at a rally held to promote that fact that 'It's Ok To Vote No.' This young guy took a very brave stance and should have been commended for swimming against the tide and breaking a stereotype that says all gay people want same-sex 'marriage.' Instead. for his trouble, he was met with ridicule and disrespect from those who claim they celebrate diversity. [click here to read more.] But this gay man is not alone in his desire to maintain the traditional definition of marriage. There are many other homosexuals who, for various reasons, are against same-sex 'marriage'. I don't agree with the reasoning of some of these commentators, but that isn't the point of this article. I simply want to illustrate the fact that there is a false narrative surrounding the Yes campaign - that the desire to redefine marriage is some kind of universally-held doctrine of the gay movement. So now follows a list of 10 prominent gays who don't want marriage equality.

Saturday, 23 September 2017 17:50

55 Consequences of Redefining Marriage

In his essay in the Public Discourse, law professor Bradley Miller suggests studying the effects of redefining marriage using three criteria:

Anyone interested in assessing the impact of same-sex marriage on public life should investigate the outcomes in three spheres: first, human rights (including impacts on freedom of speech, parental rights in public education, and the autonomy of religious institutions); second, further developments in what sorts of relationships political society will be willing to recognize as a marriage (e.g., polygamy); and third, the social practice of marriage.

We're going to take a trip around the world to look at the consequences for Christians where same-sex marriage has been legalised. And it's not only Christians who have suffered after this legislation was passed, but also atheists, agnostics, Jews and even gays themselves. The following list is only 55 of those consequences from 13 of the countries that have redefined marriage. [Note regarding citations: Several consecutive examples have a common source; the link for this is given after the last example.]  

Canada

Canada legalised same-sex marriage in 2002. Now:

  • civil celebrants sacked for refusing to perform same-sex weddings
  • writing a letter to the editor supporting traditional marriage is now considered hate speech
  • professional governing bodies can be sued for discrimination
  • for promoting traditional marriage over same sex marriage
  • parents have lost authority over their children's education
  • religious schools must tolerate groups who promote homosexuality. [Source]
  • legal action is underway to secure marriage for polygamists.[Source]
  • most cases of bestiality now legal [Source]
  • Definitely no evidence of an increase in stability. [Source]
  • Children can be removed from heterosexual parents who don't support same-sex marriage [Source]
  • pop music, (eg a Dire Straits classic) can be banned for containing words the offend homosexuals [Source]

 

Britain:

Britain legalised same sex marriage in 2013 via parliamentary vote. Now:

  • 'heteronormative' pronouns and words are prohibited in many places,
  • churches are under pressure to no longer refuse to perform same-sex marriages (protections were given at the time legislation went through),
  • Christians and other parents who oppose same-sex marriage may no longer adopt children,
  • seven faith schools are close to being shut down for failing to teach that same-sex marriage is equivalent to traditional marriage
  • no opt-out for students in sexualised school lessons, which begin at age 3. (Source)
  • Christian relationship counsellors must counsel same-sex couples [Source]
  • magistrates unable to opt-out of same-sex adoption cases [Source]
  • social media criticism of same-sex marriage can lead to demotion/pay cut [Source]
  • criticism of 'Pride' marches potentially constitutes a hate-crime [Source]
  • Promoting Easter church services warrants enquiry into homosexual 'offence' [Source]
  • Suggesting that homosexuals can change orientation warrants police enquiry [Source]
  • Employees can be dismissed for supporting traditional view of marriage [Source]
  • Clergy can be fined and sent to re-education for exercising employment rights [Source]
  • polygamy is becoming more popular in the UK [Source]

Ireland

Ireland legalised same-sex marriage in 2015 by referendum. Now:

  • small businesses can't refuse to service same-sex weddings [Source]
  • The door has been opened for recognising polygamous marriages [Source]

Scotland

Scotland legalised same-sex marriage in 2014. Now:

  • Christians are persecuted for preaching against homosexuality [Source]
  • Clergy who oppose homosexuality committing an unofficial hate-crime [Source]

 

USA

The Supreme Court of the United States legalised same-sex marriage in 2015. Now:

  • florists can't refuse to supply same-sex weddings [Source] 
  • Bakers can't refuse their services. [Source]
  • employees can be fired for expressing their opposition to same-sex marriage
  • lawyers can fail their bar test for not supporting same-sex marriage
  • Catholic adoption agencies have closed rather than serve same-sex couples
  • parents unable to opt children out of sexualised school classes [Source]
  • Calls for polygamy to be made legal [Source]
  • Calls for 'machinism' (a relationship between a human and a computer) to be made legal [Source]
  • Gay 'pride' events have become more numerous and obscene
  • gay domestic violence has increased greatly [Source]

 

Denmark

Denmark legalised same-sex marriage in 2012. Now:

  • Churches are being forced to perform same-sex weddings (protections were initially offered.) [Source]

Belgium

Belgium legalised same sex marriage in 2003. Now:

  • Clergy are persecuted for criticising homosexuality [Source]

 

Sweden

Sweden legalised same-sex marriage in 2009. Now:

  • no priest in the Swedish Church can refuse to perform a sane-sex wedding [Source]
  • preaching against homosexuality is a hate-crime [Source]
  • It is a crime to question the homosexual agenda within the school system [Source]
  • Christian groups who investigate the harms of homosexuality are persecuted [Source]

 

Spain 

Spain legalised same-sex marriage in 2005. Now:

  • On birth certificates, 'mother' and 'father' have been replaced by 'progenitor A' or 'B' [Source]
  • Clergy are persecuted for criticising homosexuality, IVF for gay couples etc [Source]

Germany

Germany legalised same-sex marriage in 2017. Now:

  • the media now links terrorism with 'homophobia' [Source]

 

Columbia 

Columbia legalised same-sex marriage in 2016. Now:
  • There is a push for legal recognition of polygamy [Source]

France

Legalised same sex marriage in 2013. Now:

  • criticising same-sex relationships is a hate-crime [Source]

 

Netherlands

The Netherlands legalised same-sex marriage in 2000. Now:

  • Celebrants are forced to perform ceremonies in some areas [Source]
  • Same-sex couples have equal rights to adopt [Source]
  • Businesses can be forced to provide services that promote homosexuality [Source]
  • Persecution of clergy who fail to support homosexuality [Source]
  • heterosexual marriage rates fell after same-sex marriage was legalised [Source]

 

13 Countries, 55 Consequences of Redefining Marriage

The examples above represent only some of the cases of persecution and discrimination that have occurred and are occurring where marriage has been redefined. In addition to these examples, there are reports to suggest that the legalisation of same-sex marriage will have an enormous impact on heterosexuals in other ways, and particularly on men. [Read more here] As Christians, we  know that the push to redefine marriage is part of a broader attack on the family, one with its roots in Marxism. In fact, Marx himself declared war on the family and Christianity, when he said:

Thus, for instance, after the earthly family is discovered to be the secret of the holy family, the former must then itself be destroyed in theory and in practice.

We simply cannot trust Yes campaigners and politicians who tell us that same-sex marriage is 'all about love'. We know full well that redefining marriage is only the tip of the iceberg and that discrimination against marriage traditionalists is certain to ensue. It's not about love, it's all about the consequences. Please vote no.  

 

In accordance with s 6(5) of the Marriage Law Survey (Additional Safeguards) Act 2017, this communication was authorised by Kathy Clubb of Melbourne, Vic.  

Thursday, 21 September 2017 11:34

Love and Other Four Letter Words

It sometimes seems that the current marriage debate is more about words than about expressing heartfelt opinions and ideas. And it's often about who can shout their words louder than the other side. Unfortunately, many of those words are four-letter ones. And they have nothing to do with the one word at the centre of the controversy: love. For it's more about 'love' than about marriage, if you believe the mouthpieces for the Yes camp. Love wins, choose love, drown out the hate with love - all these make for good hashtags. But beyond the slogan is another reality entirely, and it's more about another four-letter word: hate.  

Sunday, 03 September 2017 14:00

A Catholic Response to the Marriage Debate

While Dave Pellowe has written a very useful article intended to equip Protestant pastors, I thought I'd put together some resources specifically for Catholics or for those who want to understand the Church's stance on marriage. There has been a great deal of misinformation in Catholic circles regarding the marriage debate: while the Church's teaching is very clear, there are those who are content to deviate from this teaching and promote their own views - views which may in some circumstances be classified as formal heresy. [See Edward Peter's article linked below.] One example of this is a statement from Jesuit lecturer Fr. Frank Brennan, which suggests that it is appropriate for Catholics to support the  redefinition of marriage and that it may even be 'good for society.' [Click here to read his views.]

"I am going to die anyway. I am not being involuntarily euthanized. My nearest and dearest sympathize with my decision. I have tried very hard to beat the disease, but I have had enough and want - quite literally in my case - to go and meet my maker."

Rev. John Cartwright

Assisted Dying: Who Makes the Final Decision?

These words were written by philosopher and Congregational minister, John Cartwright. He is also a member of the Inter-Faith Leaders for Dignity in Dying. John Cartwright's outlook is shared by many people who want to see euthanasia and assisted suicide legalised, and who are convinced that the so-called 'slippery slope' poses no danger to such legislation, because stringent safeguards will be written into the laws.

Tuesday, 06 June 2017 20:29

Abortion is a Human Rights Catastrophe

Sometimes I'm stopped in the shopping centre by kind-hearted young people who are trying to raise money for various charities. One of them recently told me that diarrhea is the biggest killer of children under 5 worldwide. But I told him that abortion is the biggest killer of children world wide. [By a factor of 56!] In actual fact,  it's pneumonia that is the disease that kills the most children - it's responsible for 18% of childhood deaths worldwide. This still doesn't come close to the number of children lost to abortion, though. For children under the age of 5: 

Abortion is a Human Rights Catastrophe

According to the Australian Human Rights Commission, human rights are defined as "...the rights and freedoms contained in specific international instruments..." to which the ARHC adheres. These 'instruments' are 7 documents, including the Declaration on the Rights of the Child. Let's take a look at what the documents say about the right to life: International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: 

Part III Article 6 

Convention on the Rights of the Child

Article 6 

Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities: 

Article 10 

Declaration of the Rights of the Child:

Introduction 

Declaration on the Rights of Disabled Persons:

Point 3 

Declaration on the Rights of Mentally Retarded Persons:

Points 1 & 2

Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief:

Article 5 part 5 - [This document doesn't specifically mention a right to life, since that right is assumed as a basis for desiring freedom of religion or belief. It does, however suggest that pre-born babies are to be protected from being aborted, for cultural reasons, on the basis of gender.] Regardless of what we might think of the United Nations, Australia is a signatory to the seven documents mentioned above. So why does our country pay only lip service to this most fundamental right, by allowing 100,000 babies to be slaughtered every year? Our government not only allows this killing on demand, but subsidises it, and promotes it through a sexualised education system. Far from discouraging abortions for flimsy reasons, it's permissible to abort on the basis of gender, or for a minor disability. This callous disregard for life flows into society and creates - not a haven from abuse, as we've been promised - but an increase in child abuse and the number of murders of pregnant mothers. If we fail to acknowledge the humanity of the preborn, how can we not be confused about glaringly fundamental facts such as the nature of marriage and even gender identification? It's no wonder that we have black deaths in custody. It's no wonder that detention centres are inhumane. And it's no wonder that the criminal justice system rewards perpetrators and blames the victims. If we can't get the basics right, then nothing else is going to work properly. If we don't respect the right to life of our children, then all other rights are meaningless. We don't have to look far for a humanitarian crisis: we have one at our own front door.